Issues

Niah Cave, Sarawak, Borneo

The Niah Cave, in Sarawak (which is pronounced with the emphasis on the second syllable: sa-RA-wak), is one of the crucial sites for the antiquity of man in the Far east. It was excavated in the 1950s by the controversial figure of Tom Harrisson, who dug up the skull of a modern human being which he claimed to be 40,000 years old. Was his claim true? Professor Graeme Barker has been leading an expedition to find out, and here is the full story of what he has found: is Tom Harrisson justified?

Archaeology Abroad Awards

Archaeology Abroad Awards Short of funds to join a dig? Subscribers to Archaeology Abroad are eligible to apply for Fieldwork Awards to help meet the cost of joining an excavation or field school listed in the Autumn 2003 issue of Archaeology Abroad. This year, thanks to the generous support of The Headley Trust, Archaeology Abroad […]

Return to Chauvet Cave

The Chauvet Cave The discovery of the Chauvet Cave in the Ardèche valley in the south of France has proved to be one of the most important finds of Palaeolithic cave art since Lascaux. Following its discovery in 1994, it has been scrupulously protected, accessible to only a very few researchers, and in 1995 the […]

Genesis of the Pharaohs

Origins of Ancient Egypt How did ancient Egypt reach the point of take-off? In Genesis of the Pharaohs: Dramatic New discoveries that Re-write the Origins of Ancient Egypt (Thames and Hudson, £18.95), Toby Wilkinson of Christ’s College, Cambridge, looks to discoveries in the eastern desert. Since the early 20th century, a number of examples of […]

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