Issue 28

Golden Mycenae is one of the most famous ancient towns in the world, but how did it work? There is the Palace on its citadel and there are tombs surrounding it, yet how are they related? In the first of a two part feature, David Mason takes us to Mycenae, walking along the little-known roads to see Mycenae as the Mycenaeans saw it, with the Treasury of Atreus carefully placed for maximum impact. Thereafter, in the subsequent instalment, Andrew Selkirk leads us up onto the citadel and wonders where the ordinary Myceneans lived.
We follow Mycenae with an ancient mystery: how did the Egyptians make glass? The Egyptians held glass in high esteem, admiring its brilliance and shine. Inspired to learn more, Paul Nicholson began exploring the evidence at Tell el-Amarna, the capital of the ‘heretic pharaoh’ Akhenaten (1352-1336 BC). Amarna was planned as a ‘new town’ by Akhenaten and abandoned soon after his death. Consequently, the site offers a rare and significant snapshot of urban Egyptian life and industry at that time. In this feature, Nicholson takes us to his excavations in the industrial quarter of Amarna, and tells how his experiments with making glass furnaces have effectively shattered old interpretations of early glass-making.
Archaeology is the study of material culture, and very few materials

Travel: Berlin’s Museum Island

CWA 28

Golden Mycenae is one of the most famous ancient towns in the world, but how did it work?   In the first of a two part feature, David Mason takes us to Mycenae, walking along the little-known roads to see Mycenae as the Mycenaeans saw it, with the Treasury of Atreus carefully placed for maximum […]

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Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae

Unravelling the mystery of the location of the Treasury of Atreus – also known as the Tomb of Agamemnon – far from the other royal tombs at Mycenae

Agamemnon's death mask

Magic of Mycenae

When we asked our readers if they had a favourite World Heritage Site, Mycenae was mentioned again and again. Featured in CWA 28, it was once one of the greatest cities of the Mycenaean civilisation, dominating the eastern Mediterranean from the 15th-12th centuries BC. Today the site boasts remarkable architectural features, such as the famous Lion Gate, as well as royal graves where spectacular artefacts including the gold ‘death mask of Agamemnon’ were found in the 19th century. Andrew Selkirk takes us on a tour of Agamemnon’s capital.

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Selge, Turkey

A visit to Selge, in Turkey, an impressive Graeco-Roman city that prospered until the 7th century AD

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Egypt’s Ancient Glass

Old interpretations of Egyptian glass-making are shattered by experiments and new excavations at Amarna

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History of Corrugated Iron

Corrugated iron was a revolutionary building material. In these pages, the unusual history and scope of this valuable resource is considered

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