Category: Turkey

Ephesus_Feat

Byzantine Ephesus: Life in the city after Empire

The grand architectural monuments of Ephesus attest to its glory days as a sophisticated metropolis of the Roman Empire. But what happened when the Empire ended in the 4th century AD? Following recent excavation, Sabine Ladstätter and Michaela Binder reveal new evidence of life in the city during the turbulent days of Byzantine rule. Visitors […]

ByzantineSkele_Feat

NEWS: Death of a Byzantine Mother

An early 13th-century AD skeleton found on the outskirts of ancient Troy has yielded preserved bacterial DNA from a deadly maternal infection – an unparalleled find. The genetic material came from two calcified nodules located at the base of the chest of a 30-year-old pregnant woman discovered in a stone-lined grave by archaeologists affiliated with […]

Turish Jug_Feat

From England to Turkey: Ancient Funerary Vessel Returns Home

In an era of widespread looting and illicit antiquities trade, it seems rarer and rarer that good-hearted people stand up for the cultural heritage of another country. But then again, there are people like Thelma Bishop of Gatley and Jason Wood of Studio Ceramics at Adam Partridge Auctioneers and Valuers in Macclesfield (both in north-west […]

Göbekli-Tepe_Figure-5

Turkey’s Delight

Nicholas Kropacek, Eastern Turkey Tours Eastern Turkey is one of those truly undiscovered parts of the world that are rare to find today. It is thanks to CWA that it is being revealed to a discerning public for the right reasons: culture and history. Though it is beyond the remit of CWA, we should also mention […]

Göbekli-Tepe_Figure-9

Enduring Appeal

Denise Allen, Andante Travels There has been a curious contrast over the past decade: while archaeology has been hit hard by the recession, the level of interest of the general public has grown. People are better informed than they ever have been – through TV programmes and magazines – and we are only too delighted […]

1407

Hogarth at Carchemish

The dig Imperial rivalry and a growing awareness that little was known of a major Anatolian civilisation of Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age date – the Hittite Empire – led to a British Museum-funded expedition to explore the remains at Carchemish immediately before the First World War. The Hittites were represented by monumental […]

Book Review: The Glory of Byzantium and Early Christendom

The Glory of Byzantium and Early Christendom Antony Eastmond Phaidon Press, £59.95 ISBN 978-0714848105 Spanning the 4th-15th centuries, from the late Roman Empire to the Renaissance, the Byzantine Empire witnessed colossal cultural changes. Nowhere are these shifts reflected more clearly than in the art of its inhabitants, which sheds light on their interests, social structures, […]

1363

Turkey: Yenikapı

One of the most spectacular excavations in the world today is in the Great Harbour, built by Theodosius I in Constantinople (Istanbul). So far, 36 shipwrecks have
been discovered – most dating to the 6th to 7th centuries AD – making it by far the biggest collection of craft known from Antiquity. How was it that such a major haul of ships was excavated? Therein lies an interesting story that Andrew Selkirk starts by looking at the transport problems of modern Istanbul.

1321

Turkey: Secrets of the Chariot Makers

Solving the mysteries at Van How were some of the first chariots made? Prof. Erkan Konyar of Istanbul University believes he has the answers. His theory turns on a series of strange rock ‘symbols’ found at the early 1st millennium BC site of Van, in Easern Turkey. Nadia Durrani writes. In the early 1st millennium […]

1323

CWA travels to: Mount Nemrut

How the mighty have fallen High on a mountain top in a remote part of south-eastern Turkey, the gods congregate at a place known as Mount Nemrut (Nemrud Daği). It is not easy to reach, but definitely worth the climb. After a long trek up the mountain trail to a height of some 2,100m (6,900ft), […]

1272

Paving the way

Excavations in southern Turkey have uncovered a huge Roman mosaic, suggesting that Imperial culture was more influential on the edge of the empire than previously thought. Decorated with large squares, each filled with a colourful geometric design, the mosaic was part of a baths, lying alongside a 25ft-long (7.5m) marble-lined pool, and is thought to […]

1 2 3 4 5 >»