Category: Issue 1

It’s time for a new archaeology magazine. A magazine that will cover archaeology world wide. A magazine that will cover all periods from the first emergence of human beings down to the present day. A magazine that will be for everyone, whether beginners, seasoned enthusiasts, or indeed for the most learned academics. For the past 35 years, we have been covering archaeology in Britain in Current Archaeology, which now has a circulation of almost 20,000 subscribers. Now it is time to look at the rest of the world in a sister magazine that will appear in the alternate months to Current Archaeology.
Current World Archaeology will follow the same principles which have proved so successful in Current Archaeology.

La Milpa, Belize

Norman Hammond discovers discovers lost city of La Milpa, still mostly hidden by jungle

Model16

Amarna, Egypt

Barry Kemp has recently produced an amazing model of Amarna, the best preserved town in Egypt

Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat: Origins, Cambodia

One of South-East Asia’s most celebrated archaeological sites and one of the great marvels of the world, Angkor Wat appeared in the very first issue of CWA, as well as in #5 and, most recently, #50. Stretching over 400km², the surrounding archaeological park includes the various capitals of the Khmer Empire, from the 9th-15th century, as well as the famous temple of Angkor Thom. But when exploration began in the 18th and 19th centuries, it was quickly obvious that there was strong Indian influence. What can new research tell us about Angkor’s origins?

Llublijana, Slovenia

A wheel found in Slovenia dates to around 100 years earlier than the previous record holder

Digging Abroad

Would you like to dig abroad? If you wish to dig in Britain, you can of course consult the Handbook of Archaeology which we publish free to Current Archaeology subscribers with the Spring issue. However, if you want to dig abroad, you should subscribe to Archaeology Abroad, which publishes two bulletins a year in April […]

Kuk, Papua New Guinea

Research reveals Papua New Guinea was a region where agriculture evolved independently

Earliest Man

160,000 year old human skull discovered in Afar

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