Issues

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Travel: Discovering Spain

Launching the Palarq Award CWA’s editor-in-chief Andrew Selkirk takes us behind the scenes of a new archaeological award ‘Would you like to be a judge for a new Spanish archaeological award?’ I was asked. ‘The judging will be held in Barcelona, the award will be presented in Madrid, and we will fly you out and […]

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Richard Hodges: The Battle of Monte Cassino

Driving past Monte Cassino many years ago with the late Mark Pluciennik, professor at Leicester University and one of the most cerebral archaeologists I have known, I pointed out the Benedictine monastery. Mark replied with words I’ve never forgotten: My father was with the Poles who captured the monastery, and my uncle, his brother, as […]

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Review: Pompeii, a different perspective

Pompeii, A Different Perspective: via dell’Abbondanza – a long road, well travelledJennifer F Stephens and Arthur E StephensLockwood Press, £40ISBN 978-1937040789Review by: Lucia Marchini The ruins of Pompeii are among the most familiar sights of the ancient world, and the longest street in the Roman city – via dell’Abbondanza, which runs from the forum to […]

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Review: Connected Communities

Connected Communities: networks, identity, and social change in the ancient Cibola worldMatthew A PeeplesUniversity of Arizona Press, $60ISBN 978-0816535682Review by: Deborah L Huntley Matthew Peeples opens his book with a question that nearly every archaeologist has heard at one time or another when engaging the public at a site visit: ‘Who were the people who […]

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Review: 24 Hours in Ancient Egypt

24 Hours in Ancient Egypt: a day in the life of the people who lived thereDonald P RyanMichael O’Mara Books, £12.99ISBN 978-1782439110Review by: Matthew Symonds Ancient Egypt still exudes an aura of mystery. Visitors have been enchanted by its monuments for millennia, but the culture that created them can be harder to bring into focus. […]

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Easter Island: where to build a monument

A new study proposes links between the locations of Easter Island’s famous ahu and moai and freshwater sources. Robert J DiNapoli discusses the results and their implications. Easter Island, called Rapa Nui by its inhabitants, represents one of the most remarkable cases of ancient monument construction known in the world. Around the 13th century AD, […]

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Art meets archaeology

A fresh perspective on Pompeii and Herculaneum In the wake of the highly successful Expanded Interiors exhibition at Pompeii and Herculaneum, Catrin Huber and Ian Haynes reflect on what contemporary fine-art practice can reveal about Roman decoration. For many visitors, a trip to Pompeii and Herculaneum is all about the art. Countless ancient cities were […]

CWA Photo of the Year Competition 2019 – Winners Announced

This year’s photo competition has seen an outstanding range of archaeological images from around the world flood into the CWA office. We’ve found ourselves transported to remote excavations, magnificent monuments, and spectacular sites near and far through the talented work of our well-travelled readers. Our judge, renowned archaeological photographer Adam Stanford of Aerial-Cam, has cast […]

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The Valley of the Kings revisited

It may be the royal tombs that spring to mind when we think of the Valley of the Kings, but you did not have to be pharaoh to secure space in the cemetery. More modest tombs exist in greater numbers, although the identity of many of their occupants remains a mystery. Donald P Ryan has been investigating.

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The pharaohs did not lie in splendid isolation in the Valley of the Kings. While they held a monopoly on the spectacular royal tombs driven far into the bedrock, favoured individuals could also secure space in the cemetery. They had to make do with humbler tombs – often more modest than they would have expected […]

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Travel: Richard Hodges’ Homage to Apalirou

More than a decade ago I took a holiday on Naxos. This Cycladic island is a paradise for walkers and those who find pleasure in old high-walled mule tracks that connect miniature Byzantine churches. A German guidebook led me from village to village through this blessed landscape. One day, to escape this comforting world, I […]

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Travel: Raffles and Java

The 200th anniversary of Raffles’ arrival in Singapore has galvanised debate about the legacy of this controversial figure. His modern profile owes much to his interest in heritage, which restored his reputation after a debacle in Java. Tom St John Gray has been following in Raffles’ footsteps. Nestled among the skyscrapers and colonial buildings of […]

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