Asia

Jordan

A look at recent archaeology in Jordan with a special focus on the reconstruction of the Neolithic village of Beidha

Chitral, Pakistan

A royal fort in the Hindu Kush, and its seige in 1895: Bill Woodburn and Neil Faulkner report

Merv, Turkmenistan

Excavations in the Unbelievers City at Merv have revealed a workers’ quarter and evidence for steel making in the 9th century AD

Bam, Persia

Exclusive report on the effects of the devestating 26.12.2003 earthquake on the historical remains of Bam, Iran

Niah Cave, Sarawak, Borneo

The Niah Cave, in Sarawak (which is pronounced with the emphasis on the second syllable: sa-RA-wak), is one of the crucial sites for the antiquity of man in the Far east. It was excavated in the 1950s by the controversial figure of Tom Harrisson, who dug up the skull of a modern human being which he claimed to be 40,000 years old. Was his claim true? Professor Graeme Barker has been leading an expedition to find out, and here is the full story of what he has found: is Tom Harrisson justified?

Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat: Origins, Cambodia

One of South-East Asia’s most celebrated archaeological sites and one of the great marvels of the world, Angkor Wat appeared in the very first issue of CWA, as well as in #5 and, most recently, #50. Stretching over 400km², the surrounding archaeological park includes the various capitals of the Khmer Empire, from the 9th-15th century, as well as the famous temple of Angkor Thom. But when exploration began in the 18th and 19th centuries, it was quickly obvious that there was strong Indian influence. What can new research tell us about Angkor’s origins?

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