Features

Roman Artillery

The archaeology of a Roman technological revolution: the cheiroballistra

Chitral, Pakistan

A royal fort in the Hindu Kush, and its seige in 1895: Bill Woodburn and Neil Faulkner report

Jordan

A look at recent archaeology in Jordan with a special focus on the reconstruction of the Neolithic village of Beidha

Merv, Turkmenistan

Excavations in the Unbelievers City at Merv have revealed a workers’ quarter and evidence for steel making in the 9th century AD

Bam, Persia

Exclusive report on the effects of the devestating 26.12.2003 earthquake on the historical remains of Bam, Iran

Zahi Hawass

Pyramids: Excavation and Preservation

One of the seven wonders of the ancient world, the Pyramids have fascinated and baffled visitors for centuries, the difficulty of their construction seemingly at odds with their great age. Now the former Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, Zahi Hawass, shares his memories of working with these magnificent monuments when he was the Director General of the Giza Pyramids, Saqqara, Heliopolis, and the Bahariya Oasis for 15 eventful years between 1987 and 2002.

Butrint, Albania

The Graeco-Roman site of Butrint, is hitherto little known, because it lies in Albania, and has thus been little visited. But since Albania has been free, Butrint has been a triumph

Frobisher and the North-West passage

In 1576, the Elizabethan adventurer Martin Frobisher setout to discover the North-west passage to China, across the barren wastes of northern Canada. He failed to find the passage, and spent most of his time on a fool’s search for gold – but the remains of his settlement have recently been excavated by Robert McGhee, who has produced the reconstruction of the hut shown here.

Niah Cave, Sarawak, Borneo

The Niah Cave, in Sarawak (which is pronounced with the emphasis on the second syllable: sa-RA-wak), is one of the crucial sites for the antiquity of man in the Far east. It was excavated in the 1950s by the controversial figure of Tom Harrisson, who dug up the skull of a modern human being which he claimed to be 40,000 years old. Was his claim true? Professor Graeme Barker has been leading an expedition to find out, and here is the full story of what he has found: is Tom Harrisson justified?

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