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CWA 61

CWA is celebrating its 10th birthday with a special anniversary issue: Editor in Chief Andrew Selkirk flicks back through the pages to take a fresh look at how the archaeology of the last decade has re-shaped our understanding of our past. But what of the future? We invited a panel of eminent archaeologists to share […]

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CWA 60

The lost Egyptian cities of Thonis and Heracleion appear in the historical record but their whereabouts were long forgotten since disappearing beneath the waters of the Mediterranean 1,200 years ago. In fact, Thonis and Heracleion are the Egyptian and Greek names for the same city port that flourished for centuries at the mouth of the […]

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CWA 59

Sailors, from the Neolithic to the Byzantine periods, approaching the shores of Malta from the south east could not have failed to notice the temple site of Tas Silġ on the hill above the shoreline. For nearly 5,000 continuous years, visitors flocked to this place of ritual that evolved and adapted to changing religious practices. […]

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CWA 58

Archaeologists in Estonia have discovered the most extraordinary site: a mass grave comprising two Viking ship burials. They date to about AD 750, and bear witness to bloody battle on the shores of the Estonian island Saaremaa. A weary gang of warriors laid out their dead aboard one of the ships and covered them with […]

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CWA 57

The elaborate rock-hewn tombs of Petra, in Jordan, have inspired visitors, poets, and film-makers alike, ever since the Swiss explorer Johann Ludwig Burckhardt stumbled across the Khazneh (the Treasury) in 1812. But what lies behind the monumental rock-hewn façades in the ‘rose red city half as old as time’? In the first study of its […]

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CWA 56

Three thousand years ago, the daughter of a priest from the temple of Amun at Karnak was laid to rest in the nearby Valley of the Kings. The tomb already had an occupant, but grave robbers had long since done their worst. So the ransacked body was carefully rewrapped, laid to one side, and lightly […]

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CWA 55

The Diablo Pyramid, in Guatemala, covers an earlier temple whose intricately decorated façade was carefully packed to preserve its huge stucco masks. These great faces of the Maya Sun God in its many guises once glowered across the horizon, painted a deep red and caught by the dying sun would have been visible for miles around. Why did they go to so much trouble? Could it be connected with the discovery of a royal tomb just in front of it? Who is the dead man, surrounded by exotic grave goods and grim sacrificial offerings?

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CWA 54

Our cover is inspired by this summer’s exhibition at the British Museum, which prompted Chris Catling to examine the vital role horse power played in more than 6,000 years of human history. He discovered, surprisingly, that it all began with the humble donkey. Past study of Ancient Egypt often concentrated on the examination of monumental […]

Hadrian sculpture

CWA 40

Before oil and gas, the Arabian Gulf grew rich on another natural resource: pearls. From the mid 18th until the early 20th century AD the international demand for pearls was insatiable. The local economy boomed. However, almost as fast as it boomed, so it bust. The story of this heady rise and fall is illustrated […]

Travel: Hadrian MCM

CWA 39

Between Mycenaean Greece and Classical Greece there is a ‘Dark Age’ during which civilization appears to have collapsed and little is known. But now, at Lefkandi on the Aegean island of Euboea, a site has been found that bridges this dark gap. What have they found? The answers are revealed thanks to a major exploration […]

Travel: Hadrian MCM

CWA 41

This issue features a trove of Turkish treasures. We begin in the ancient city of Myra on the southern coast of Turkey. This was once home to St Nicolas, the benign 4th century bishop of subsequent Santa Claus fame. Myra’s remains include a vast 11,000 capacity Roman-era theatre and numerous intricate rock-carved tombs — as […]

Travel: Hadrian MCM

CWA 38

We think of chemical weapons as one of the horrifying features of modern warfare.  We might assume that it all started with the First World War. But did it? Our cover feature investigates the gruesome evidence of a stack of bodies discovered inside a siege tunnel at the ancient Syrian frontier city of Dura-Europos. How […]

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