Europe

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French wine: 2,500-year-old vintage

Wine was introduced to France from Italy, with the first Gaulish vintages produced in c.500 BC, according to newly-published chemical analysis.  Archaeological work at Lattara, a port in southern France dated to c.525-475 BC, uncovered a number of imported Etruscan amphorae stylistically linked to Cisra in central Italy. Chemical analysis of residues found within these […]

1407

Hogarth at Carchemish

The dig Imperial rivalry and a growing awareness that little was known of a major Anatolian civilisation of Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age date – the Hittite Empire – led to a British Museum-funded expedition to explore the remains at Carchemish immediately before the First World War. The Hittites were represented by monumental […]

Book Review: The Glory of Byzantium and Early Christendom

The Glory of Byzantium and Early Christendom Antony Eastmond Phaidon Press, £59.95 ISBN 978-0714848105 Spanning the 4th-15th centuries, from the late Roman Empire to the Renaissance, the Byzantine Empire witnessed colossal cultural changes. Nowhere are these shifts reflected more clearly than in the art of its inhabitants, which sheds light on their interests, social structures, […]

1398

CWA travels to: Knossos & Gournia

In the land of the minotaur Early summer, before the start of the school holidays, is the ideal time to visit Knossos: the weather is perfect but, more importantly, there are few cruise ships basking in the harbour at Heraklion, and few holiday-makers to crowd the view. So I found myself wandering the spectacular ruins […]

Richard Hodges travels to: Venice

Modern Italy has its problems, but it also has truly exceptional assets. Its new high-speed trains rate pretty highly on any list of new resources, while of those from the past, Venice – it goes without saying – is truly fuori dal mondo: out of this world. From Rome to Venice on the frecciarossa – […]

Book Review: Rock Art and Seascapes in Uppland

Rock Art and Seascapes in Uppland Johan Ling Oxbow Books, £20.00 ISBN 978-1842175132 Sweden boasts a stunning array of Early Bronze Age artwork, with rocky outcrops crammed with images of boats, people, and animals (CWA 54). In this slender new volume, Johan Ling provides a detailed study of the imagery on around 80 rock panels […]

1377

Neolithic novelty north of the Alps

Excavations in Switzerland have revealed the first intact Neolithic burial chamber north of the Alps. The dolmen, at Oberbipp in the Canton of Bern, contains the remains of at least 28 individuals dating to about 5,000 years ago. Marianne Ramstein, director of excavations, explained that examples of such burial chambers are rare, most are in […]

1376

La Tène treasures

Archaeological work ahead of the construction of warehouses at Buchères, near Troyes, France, has uncovered the graves of around 30 Gaulish warriors and women, dating back more than 2,000 years. Excavated by the Institut National de Recherches Archeologiques Préventives (INRAP), the individuals are thought to have belonged to a small La Tène period community who […]

1395

Road to success: Roman globalisation

In 312 BC, Appius Claudius set out to build a road from Rome to the south of Italy. So began the extensive road network that, argues Ray Laurence, paved the way for commercial domination of the Roman world.

1391

Tas-Silġ, Malta

For nearly 5,000 years, the sanctuary site at Tas-Silġ lured worshippers to its idyllic island setting overlooking the blue waters of the Mediterranean, evolving and adapting as new religions emerged. Now, 20 years of archaeological research is bringing this long forgotten but once influential religious centre back into the limelight, as David Cardona reveals.

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