Africa

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Scanning the Pharaohs

The results of cutting-edge CT imaging on Ramesses III, Hatshepsut, Tutankhamen, and a host of other New Kingdom mummies are revealed in a gripping new book by Zahi Hawass and Sahar Saleem.   Scanning the Pharaohs: CT Imaging of the New Kingdom Royal Mummies is the latest page-turner from Zahi Hawass, former Egyptian minister of […]

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Before Aksum: Excavating Ethiopia’s Earliest Civilisation

In the 1st millennium AD, Ethiopia was home to the great civilisation of Aksum, one of the world’s first Christian kingdoms. But what came before Aksum? A joint Ethiopian-German project near Wuqro in the Tigray highlands is uncovering unprecedented finds and revealing a fascinating picture, as Steven Matthews and Saskia Büchner explain. The mighty civilisation of Aksum, […]

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Richard Hodges travels to… Morocco

At Christmas time, the sky in Morocco appears infinite and unchangingly serene, a natural partner of this expansive landscape. Sheltered by this sky, the Moroccans are gentle and surprisingly calm. Worlds away from the rhythm of the Mediterranean, this north-west corner of Africa, once the ancient Roman province of Mauretania, boasts three great Classical sites, […]

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The mystery of Naukratis

Revealing Egypt’s international port From the late 7th century BC, the Nile Delta port of Naukratis was the world’s gateway to Egypt. Yet, despite early archaeological research at the site, it has languished in the shadows. Who lived there, how did the port operate, and what (sometimes salacious) secrets remained hidden? Alexandra Villing and Ross […]

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Brutal Stone Age Massacre

Evidence for the brutal massacre of a hunter-gatherer group is shattering long-held beliefs that pre-farming societies were essentially peaceful. The remains of more than 27 individuals uncovered at Nataruk, 30km west of Lake Turkana in Kenya, include at least eight women – one in the final stages of pregnancy – and six young children. Radiocarbon […]

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Wonders of Egypt

Ancient World Tours  While, within the last ten years, many important historical sites have become off-limits in countries like Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Libya, people still travel to Egypt. Despite the Arab Spring and subsequent turmoil, archaeologists keep working – often in difficult circumstances. A prime example is the excellent work by the Supreme Council […]

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Learning from Mummies

Prof Rosalie David, University of Manchester & former Director of the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology  Biomedical Egyptology, a multidisciplinary study based on analytical investigation of mummies and associated material, has added a new dimension to the study of Ancient Egypt, bridging the gap between arts and sciences. The University of Manchester (UK) has developed an Ancient […]

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Unlocking Egyptian Secrets

Joyce Tyldesley, Manchester University Egyptology is a relatively new and fast-moving science: it is not yet 200 years since Champollion decoded the hieroglyphic script (1822) and revealed Egypt’s dynastic history. Increasingly, we are able to tie that long history into Egypt’s archaeological remains. The past decade has seen major changes in our understanding of mummification, and in […]

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Egypt’s Archaeology and Revolution

Chris Naunton, Director of the Egypt Exploration Society It is worth reminding ourselves just how thrilling archaeology in Egypt has continued to be, despite the widely held belief that there probably isn’t much left to find. My personal highlights in recent years include: evidence at Tell Ed-Daba by Manfred Bietak that corroborates the well-known iconography showing that […]

Book Review: Horemheb: the forgotten pharaoh

Horemheb: The Forgotten Pharaoh Charlotte Booth Amberley, £9.99 ISBN 978-1445610184   Coming to the throne shortly after Akhenaten and Tutankhamun, Horemheb is often overshadowed by his more famous predecessors. Yet his 15-year reign was vital in restoring stability to Egypt after the dramatic cultural and social changes of the Amarna period, Charlotte Booth writes in […]

Interview: Dr Zahi Hawass in his own words

Egypt’s former Minister of State for Antiquities Affairs fell into archaeology by chance, yet it came to dominate his life. Dr Zahi Hawass talks to CWA about how he discovered his passion for his country’s rich heritage, and why it remains undiminished to this day.

Meet the mosaic ancestors

Australopithecus sediba had a mixture of primitive and modern anatomical features, and a unique way of walking, newly published research says. The first fossilised remains of the hominid, which lived around two million years ago, were found in 2008 (CWA 41), at Malapa, 48km (30 miles) north of Johannesburg in South Africa. Now, six new […]

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