Roman

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CWA 86

Giza is one of the most celebrated archaeological sites in the world. Although it is revered for its spectacular pyramids, research over the last few decades has shed light on a living community that grew up to service the dead. In our cover feature we examine their role in dispatching the deceased on a voyage […]

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Review: Roman Frontier Studies 2009

Roman Frontier Studies 2009 N Hodgson, P Bidwell, and J Schachtmann (eds) Archaeopress, £90.00 ISBN 978-1784915902 Review by: Matthew Symonds Every three years students and scholars of Roman frontiers gather to discuss the latest discoveries and thoughts. A lasting memento of these meetings is usually issued a few years later in the form of a […]

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Marzamemi Shipwreck: Moving Christian Architecture for Justinian’s Empire

Justin Leidwanger and Sebastiano Tusa dive into a 6th-century puzzle off the coast of Sicily.   In 1959, a local fisherman, searching for cuttlefish in the shallow waters off the coast of south-east Sicily, spotted several carved stone blocks nestled among the rocks, reef, and sand about a kilometre from the coastal port of Marzamemi. […]

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Sicilian splendours

Sicily, one of the world’s great crossroads of culture, is the subject of the British Museum’s latest must-see exhibition, Sicily: Culture and Conquest. Curators Dirk Booms and Peter Higgs take us behind the scenes, telling the story using five of their favourite objects from the displays. Sicily sits in the centre of the Mediterranean, its […]

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Richard Hodges travels to… Morocco

At Christmas time, the sky in Morocco appears infinite and unchangingly serene, a natural partner of this expansive landscape. Sheltered by this sky, the Moroccans are gentle and surprisingly calm. Worlds away from the rhythm of the Mediterranean, this north-west corner of Africa, once the ancient Roman province of Mauretania, boasts three great Classical sites, […]

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Germanicia Mosaics

Aysegul Gurgezoglu Tuzun visits Kahramanmaraş Archaeological Museum in Turkey  Germanicia, beneath the modern city of Kahramanmaraş in southern Turkey, played host to many civilisations during a long and illustrious lifetime that stretches back to the Stone Age. Hittites, Urartians, Assyrians, Persians, Macedonians, and Seleucan kings have all ruled here, each conquering and renaming this important city, […]

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A step ahead

Michaela Binder examines evidence of Europe’s earliest known artificial foot.  Though people have lived on the Hemmaberg, a mountain settlement in southern Austria, since Neolithic times, our research focuses on a small cemetery that belongs to the period shortly before the site was destroyed in the 6th century AD. The 27 graves of men, women, and children […]

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CWA 74

Metropolis, not Superman’s home town but the Ionian City of the Mother Goddess, was a major Classical city established in Anatolia during the 3rd century BC. Crowned by an acropolis, it lies above fertile plains on the road to Ephesus, its magnificent monumental architecture testament to the sophistication of its wealthy citizens. So why has nobody heard of it? Serdar […]

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CWA 69

Excavation at a Bronze Age hilltop settlement in south-east Spain has uncovered the burial of an elite couple dating to about 1650 BC. The archaeological record shows that just a century later the world as they had known it was gone. Civil unrest had overturned the old order, and all traces of this little-known Argaric culture disappeared almost overnight. […]

Roman slaves

Were Roman slaves hungry?    What was it like to be a slave in the Roman Empire? The answer, according to the latest excavations at Vagnari, is that slaves were rather better looked after than one might expect:  they ate quite well, they suffered less from childhood starvation than did the population in general, and […]

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