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A Fragrant Grave Featured Grave

A Fragrant Grave: Revealing the mummified remains of a 17th-century bishop

In life, Bishop Peder Winstrup was a renowned theologian, chaplain to the king, and founding father of Lund University. In death, he has proved no less remarkable. Palaeoecologist Per Lagerås reveals the secrets the bishop took to his grave. Bishop Peder Winstrup died in December 1679, aged 74, and was buried beneath Lund Cathedral. When, in 2014, it was decided […]

Missing copies

Missing any copies of CWA?

If you’ve got gaps in your collection of Current World Archaeology, some of our subscribers may be able to help: A subscriber in East Sussex is offering a complete set of CWA from issue 1 to 90. There is no charge for the magazines, but any takers will either pay postage or arrange collection. A subscriber is offering several […]

Chantress

A decade of World Archaeology

  Ten years ago, CWA was launched on its maiden voyage of discovery. Here, Editor in Chief Andrew Selkirk flicks back through the pages to reflect on what we have learned on our travels, as well as what the next decade may bring.     So, what has been happening over the past ten years? […]

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Anniversary Round Up

Ten years ago, CWA was launched on its maiden voyage of discovery. Here, experts from around the archaeological world share their insights into the greatest changes they have witnessed in that time, as well as what the next decade may bring.   Click on the articles to read more…   On a Scientific Roll by Prof […]

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Africa: Namib Desert

A forgotten WWI battlefield lies in Africa’s Namib Desert. Few historical accounts exist of the campaigns fought here, so James Stejskal and John Kinahan look to the archaeological record for evidence of conflicts that helped change the course of world history.

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Road to success: Roman globalisation

In 312 BC, Appius Claudius set out to build a road from Rome to the south of Italy. So began the extensive road network that, argues Ray Laurence, paved the way for commercial domination of the Roman world.

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Egyptian medicine

To early Orientalists, they were exotic people who used arcane ritual and repulsive medicines; but in Antiquity, Egyptian doctors were regarded as the epitome of medical excellence. Prof. Rosalie David tells CWA how recent investigations are revealing their exceptional pioneering practices.

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Tas-Silġ, Malta

For nearly 5,000 years, the sanctuary site at Tas-Silġ lured worshippers to its idyllic island setting overlooking the blue waters of the Mediterranean, evolving and adapting as new religions emerged. Now, 20 years of archaeological research is bringing this long forgotten but once influential religious centre back into the limelight, as David Cardona reveals.

Roman Mediterranean: Stamping Ground

As a schoolboy, Philip Kenrick was hooked by the fine red Samian ware he found amongst the coarse indigenous pottery at a site on the Watling Street in England. Otherwise known as terra sigillata, its more handsome precursor comes from Italy, and was traded throughout the Roman world. After enjoying great popularity, it suddenly fell from grace. Why?

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