Category: Issue 12

Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, burial place of the Pharaohs of the New Kingdom, must be one of the most extensively explored archaeological sites in the world, yet it is only in the last decade that the biggest tomb in the whole valley has been discovered. KV5, as it is now known was thought to be insignificant and undecorated. However, Professor Kent Weeks has been conducting a huge Theban Mapping Project and this led to its rediscovery. So far over 100 chambers have been excavated – and more await discovery: here we tell the story of the excavations so far.
And then we come to one of the finest mosaics discovered anywhere in the Roman World in recent years. Dated to the 3rd century AD, it has recently come to light in the romantic desert city of Palmyra, in Syria. The mosaic dates to the troubled days of the 3rd century AD, when Roman rules collapsed and Palmyra was setting itself up as the bulwark of Rome against the Persian barbarians. What is the inner meaning of this sumptuous and mysterious mosaic?
And now for some rescue archaeology. One of the largest engineering projects in the world has recently been completed, the so-called BTC pipe line constructed by BP from Baku on the Caspian via Tbilisi in Georgia, to Ceynat on the Mediterranean in Turkey. BP have also ensured that it is a huge archaeological rescue project, and invited Nadia Durrani to visit Turkey to report on how they carried out their work, and what has been discovered.
Then we offer two very different postcards. Richard Hodges writes from Macedonia, while Timothy Clack has been in Kilimanjaro undertaking anthropological research among the Chagga People. His research has focused on their Christian religious practices, which, he argues, have traces of their erstwhile ‘traditional’ beliefs.
Where was the Garden of Eden? Fifty years ago the Danish Archaeologist Geoffrey Bibby discovered a Mesopotamian temple on the island of Bahrain and suggested that this might have been Dilmun, the site of the Garden of Eden. Now 50 years on, celebrations were held to mark the anniversary and to promote the charms of archaeology in Bahrain. CWA was invited to Bahrain to report on the celebrations. In addition to the Diary come the other regulars: News and Books.
Finally, the CWA index covers all of the articles from issue 1-12 in this, our first volume. Tempus fugit.

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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The latest discoveries at KV5, the largest ancient Egyptian tomb ever discovered in the Valley…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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A detailed look at the finest mosaics discovered anywhere in the Roman world for a…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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The new Baku-Tblisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline. CWA investigates the fate of archaeology

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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A project to reconstruct a 5000 BC henge monument, interpreted as a solar observatory, the…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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In early June a glittering European Awards Ceremony was held in Bergen, Norway to celebrate…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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In early June a glittering European Awards Ceremony was held in Bergen, Norway to celebrate…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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Nebra is proving to be a rich archaeological area with the breaking news of the…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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Researchers suspect the corpse of Oetzi, the 5,000-year-old mummy frozen in the Italian Alps might…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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University College London's Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology has won the Classic Award at the…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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As the summer sets in, how about exchanging your luxury hotel for a cave house,…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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Currently on exhibition at Oxford's Ashmolean Museum is an example of what many art historians…

Current World Archaeology 13 years ago
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Fake prehistoric rock art of a caveman with a wire shopping trolley has been hung…